Home   Publication   Moving shadows contribute to the corridor illusion in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

Tomoko Imura, Masaki Tomonaga

Moving shadows contribute to the corridor illusion in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

Journal of Comparative Psychology, 123, 280-286., doi: 10.1037/a0015839


Abstract

Previous studies have reported that backgrounds depicting linear perspective and texture gradients influence relative size discrimination in nonhuman animals (known as the “corridor illusion”), but research has not yet identified the other kinds of depth cues contributing to the corridor illusion. This study examined the effects of linear perspective and shadows on the responses of a chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes ) to the corridor illusion. The performance of the chimpanzee was worse when a smaller object was presented at the farther position on a background reflecting a linear perspective, implying that the corridor illusion was replicated in the chimpanzee (Imura, Tomonaga, & Yagi, 2008). The extent of the illusion changed as a function of the position of the shadows cast by the objects only when the shadows were moving in synchrony with the objects. These findings suggest that moving shadows and linear perspective contributed to the corridor illusion in a chimpanzee.