Visual Experience Influences 12-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Goal-Directed Actions of Others

Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, Yuka Kawakita, Mako Okanda, Hideko Takeshita
DOI: 10.1037/a0023765

Abstract

In the present study, we investigated whether infants' own visual experiences affected their perception of the visual status of others engaging in goal-directed actions. In Experiment 1, infants viewed video clips of successful and failed goal-directed actions performed by a blindfolded adult, with half the infants having previously experienced being blindfolded. The results showed that 12-month-old infants who were previously blindfolded preferred to look longer at the demonstrator's successful actions, whereas no such preference was observed in 8-month-old infants. In Experiment 2, infants watched the same 2 actions when the adult demonstrator was not blindfolded. The responses of 12-month-old infants were the opposite of those observed in Experiment 1: They showed a preference for the failed actions. These findings suggest that previous experience influenced the subsequent perception of others' goal-directed actions in the 12-month-old infants. We favor the interpretation that the preference for the successful actions in the 12-months-old infants provided with blindfolded experience demonstrates the influence of perceptual experience on considering the visual status of others engaging in goal-directed actions.

Article Information
Myowa-Yamakoshi M, Kawakita Y, Okanda M, Takeshita H(2011)Visual Experience Influences 12-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Goal-Directed Actions of Others Developmental Psychology, Vol 47(4), Jul 2011, 1042-1049. https://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0023765